SUPPORT

I was rather concerned that the biggest squashes might fall off, that the stem would break under their weight so I decided to rig up some support.

All it needed was a piece of old green netting for the big round one and two old onion nets and all is we.. It would be a shame if I lost them now, after all the effort….

FEEDING

Despite the very dry period my monsters seem to be getting bigger. One of the Zucca da marmelata fruits increased so much I had to create a support for it, I don’t want to lose it too soon, before being fully ripe. I hope it’ll hold it.

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There is one more monster but I don’t think I shall try to do anything, hope for the best.

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My very own Maltese pumpkin – well, one of a few – let’s see what he’ll manage.

PAMPERING…

..and talking to my plants certainly works. If a certain member of the royal family can do it, so can I.

There are two schools of thought as far as looking after tomatoes is concerned – take the leaves off or don’t. I go with the first one and it seems to work.

To be honest, I was feeding them with a mix of seaweed extract, comfrey tea and the liquid from my wormery. On top of than I topped the soil in the grow pots with Farmyard manure and soil improver from B&Q. Something must have worked!

The squashes are climbing well up and along the structures I’ve constructed for them, they have also been fed with the seaweed extract and some Fish, blood and bone.

And of course, all of them get encouragement from me!!

GREENHOUSE

I was much better organised this year with my allotment greenhouse. It is only small, not really perfect but it seems to do the job.

I planted some cucumber plants there and a number of different tomato plants.

They are doing amazingly well, I’m just waiting for the tomatoes to turn red. Once one of them goes, the others will follow.

Another thing I had to do on my plot was to build a new structure for my squashes. I had them climbing up on rather rustic structures last year but the combined effect of strong winds in the autumn and the weight of one of my Zucca da marmelata’s brought the whole thing crashing down.

The new structure is much more sturdy – lower but firmly fixed. It will be there for a few years. The first plants are beginning to climb and some have fruit already. I am watering and feeding almost every day. It will be worth it!

JELLY

What would have been a waste has been turned to something delicious, a savoury jelly.

It would have been a shame to waste the thinned-out apples, we have two kinds of yummy jelly. Perfect with cold meat or cheese….

THINNINGS

The June drop has been and gone and I have decided to thin out apples, not only on my trees but on my friend’s trees too.

They will boil down to a mush and then I will put them in a muslin bag and let it all drip during the night. It will make a very tasty jelly – perhaps with chilli or garlic or some herbs. Watch this space!

BEES

We did have a bee hive on the site but unfortunately the bees swarmed twice and left us – obviously they didn’t like us!

Shame, it would have been good for the plants but I haven’t given up. I have found out about Mason bees. I would very much like to get them, next year , it is late this year and hopefully it’ll be a big help to our plants. Not only that but it’ll help to keep them going.

I’ll be going to the NEC on the 17th of this month to the BBC garden show, I might find out a bit more there.

 

FIGS

My fig tree looks settled and happy on the allotment. I think this year we shall have a reasonable harvest; the original tree is in the back garden and gives us a huge harvest each year. I never thought I would be able to grow figs here in the Midlands. The cuttings take well, I have found that I have to be patient. I prune the old tree every February and this year I saved about ten cuttings. Planted them in the bottom of the greenhouse in the back garden and will leave them til next spring. Then I shall dig them out very carefully and plant them on the allotment – the idea is to create a small fig orchard – about 8 to 10 trees.

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JUNE

After a fairly dismal start everything seems to be growing well – not quite everything, the carrots, parsnips and beetroot didn’t germinate well, I had to re-seed them and even that is struggling. Never mind, I live in hope.

The squashes are doing much better though. As usual I will grow my tromboncino and zucca da marmelata and I add some new ones to it – zucca Hubbard and a Maltese pumpkin.

The squashes had a lovely structure last year but as one zucca da marmelata was about 7 kilo it pulled the structure down – with the help of a fairly fierce wind. Back to the drawing board then and I have constructed a new structure this year, in fact three of them. Much sturdier and I very much hope they will last a few years.

I planted a couple of squashes beside each vertical and with a little bit of coaxing they will climb.

After this I harvested one part of the garlic plants, purely to get it out of the ground to clear a square piece of land to implement my plan.

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I have rescued two raised beds – they were abandoned on an empty plot so I thought I’d give them a chance to be useful. And useful they are for me – they are made in such a way that the corners are hinged so they can fold flat. Well, they’re not flat any more, I have put them on the plot, ready to plant with the autumn broad beans. That means that I can cover them with some netting as last autumn the pigeons ate all of my broad bean plants!!